Nerium oleander

Description
Stem to 6 m tall. Leaves very narrowly elliptic, 5-21 X 1-3.5 cm, leathery, base cuneate or decurrent on petiole, apex acuminate or acute. Leaves are opposite or in whorled.
Flowers showy, fragrant. Sepals narrowly triangular to narrowly ovate, 3-10 mm. Corolla purplish red, pink, white, salmon, or yellow, tube 1.2-2.2 cm; lobes 1.3-3 cm, single or double. Follicles cylindric, 12-23 cm. Seeds oblong, coma 0.9-1.2 cm. Fl. spring-autumn. 2n = 22.

Distribution
Sun to partial shade, withstands dry conditions. Well adapted to coastal areas. It is commonly used in highway median strip plantings in California and Texas. The species is currently wide spread and it is difficult to determine a precise region of origin. It is considered native through the Mediterranean region, to the Arabian Peninsula, the Middle East, to India and central China.

Caution
Oleander has historically been considered a poisonous plant (in particular, to herbivorous animals). ALL PARTS OF THIS PLANT ARE HIGHLY TOXIC AND MAY BE FATAL. It contains cardiac glycosides, which are known to be toxic when ingested. These and other poisons are found in all parts of the plant, whether dried or green. Ingestion of oleander plant parts can lead to serious illness and possibly death.

Poisoning Events
Cases of oleander poisonings due to accidental exposure, intentional ingestion and medicinal use have been reported worldwide. In Japan, a 49-year-old female drank water extract of oleander for suicide. Toxic symptoms appeared 30 minutes after ingestion. She died 1 day after admission (to the hospital). In the United States, a 42-year-old female burnt oleander for the disposal of prunings and inhaled the smoke periodically for 2 hours. She had toxic symptoms for 2 days, and recovered uneventfully after hospital treatment.


References:

  1. College of Agricultural Sciences - Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University
    https://landscapeplants.oregonstate.edu/plants/nerium-oleander
  2. Chinese Plant Name of Nerium oleander
    www.efloras.org
  3. The North Carolina Extension Gardener Plant Toolbox - NC State University
    https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/nerium-oleander
  4. Toxicology of Nerium oleander, Hospital Authority
    https://www3.ha.org.hk/toxicplant/en/nerium_oleander.html
Posted by lunababy22 lunababy22, 26 June, 2022 01:20

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