Photos / Sounds

What

Long-tailed Burnet Moths (Family Himantopteridae)

Observer

shannru_wei

Date

April 2022

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What

Common Blue (Polyommatus icarus)

Observer

pluvialis

Date

August 14, 2005 04:18 PM CEST

Description

gynandromorph

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What

Mabira Forest Sylph (Ceratrichia mabirensis)

Observer

bartwursten

Date

March 9, 2013 09:37 AM CET

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What

Silver-studded Blue (Plebejus argus)

Date

July 4, 2023 01:24 PM CEST

Description

wrong copula with Satyrium w-album

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What

Butterflies and Moths (Order Lepidoptera)

Observer

nocturnalmedia

Date

October 30, 2023 06:30 PM CET

Photos / Sounds

Observer

peptolab

Date

February 4, 2024 08:41 PM EST

Description

Nassulides pictus (Greef, 1888) Foissner, Agatha & Berger 2002 from a rainwater puddle in a neglected lawn. Imaged in Nomarski DIC on Olympus BH2S using SPlanap 40 0.95 objective plus variable phone camera cropping on Samsung Galaxt S9+. The cell measure 80 um in length. The cytoplasm is filled with colorful (mostly green) algae. The cytopharyngeal basket or nasse is plainly visible as are the single mid-cell contractile vacuole and the round macronucleus. Optical sectioning shows the small pellicular mucocysts. There are a few short caudal cilia as depicted by Foissner et al 1994 but not mentioned in the text. The hypostomial frange could not be imaged. A right anterior patch of yellowish granules is visualized.

Nassula is a genus of unicellular ciliates, belonging to the class Nassophorea. Like other members of the class, Nassula possesses a basket-like feeding apparatus (nasse, or cyrtos) made up of cytopharyngeal rods (nematodesmata), which are themselves composed of closely packed microtubules. Nassula use this structure to ingest filamentous cyanobacteria, drawing individual strands of blue-green algae through the cytopharynx and into the body of the cell, where they are digested. As the algae are broken down, they can take on a variety of bright colours, which give Nassula a distinctive, variegated appearance under the microscope. The body is ovoid to elongate, and uniformly ciliated, with a single macronucleus and a partial hypostomial frange (synhymenium) running from the left side of the cell to the oral aperture. When food is scarce, members of the genus have the ability to become dormant by forming a microbial cyst. Excystment can be induced by exposure to a medium inoculated with wild bacteria.

Nassula reproduce asexually, by fission. During reproduction, the cell is divided transversally. As in most ciliates (with the exception of the Karyorelictea) the macronucleus splits, during division, and the micronuclei also undergo mitosis. While fission is an asexual process, it may be preceded by conjugation, during which compatible mating individuals come together and transfer genetic material across a cytoplasmic link. In conjugation, the micronuclei of each cell undergo meiosis, and haploid micronuclei are then exchanged from one cell to the other. After sexual exchange has occurred, both conjugants will divide by fission.

Diagnostic features from Foissner et al (1994):
1) Size in vivo 70-140 x 35-70 um, mostly around 100 um long.
2) Shape clumsy ellipsoid. Slightly flattened ventrally.
3) Macronucleus usually spherical slightly behind the middle of the body. 1 small micronucleus.
4) Contractile vacuole approximately in the middle of the body, surrounded by small auxiliary vacuoles.
5) Extrusomes (mucocysts; no rod-shaped trichocysts) barely recognizable, according to methyl green. However, when stained with pyronin they form a thick shell. Cells through many close food vacuoles with cyanobacteria and algae in various stages of digestion are strikingly colorful.
6) Approximately 37-50 longitudinal ciliary rows. Few elongated caudal cilia (depicted but not described in text).

7) Mouth funnel (nasse/cyrtos) in the front third of the body approximately in the median, without a clear ring made of around 24 strongly twisted bars. Hypostomial cilia band (synhymenium) straight, consisting of 7-8 tufts arranged obliquely to the somatic rows of eyelashes.

Because of the mostly colorful coloring and the striking nasse it is easily recognizable as a nassulid ciliate. Following species have a similar size and shape (FOISSNER 1989): Nassula tumida MASKELL (contractile vacuole clearly behind the middle of the body, described superficially); N. terricola FOISSNER (8-10 hypostomial cilia tufts; hypostomial cilia band sigmoid; cyst with bar-like protrusions jumps, whereas in N. picta it is smooth; N. vernalis GELEI & SZABADOS (with fusiform,easily recognizable trichocysts, 40-50 very fine nasse rods); N. citrea KAHL (with spindle-shaped, easily recognizable trichocysts, 34-38 nasse rods; Re-description in EISLER 1986); Obertumia gracilis FOISSNER and O. Kahli FOISSNER (hypostomial cilia band divided into two, about 16 Reuscythe sticks). From Nassula ornata (155-320 um, with spindle-shaped, easily recognizable trichocysts) and Obertrumia aurea (around 200 um) easily distinguished by their much smaller size. The separation from the sometimes colorful -+ Holophrya species is best done by the location of the nasse (more delicate and apical in Holophrya) and the contractile vacuole (in the posterior end in Holophrya). Features 1, 5, 7 are particularly important for identification.

Nassulides nov. gen. Diagnosis: Nassulid organelles numerous, rightmost ones orientated obliquely to frange axis and overlapping proximally, others arranged parallel to frange axis. Type species: Nassula picta Greef, 1888. Etymology: Composite of Nassula (nassa; lat., basket) and ides (gr., similar to genus
Nas sula). Masculine gender.
Systematic position and comparison with related genera: Nassulides has a nassulid frange which commences underneath the oral opening, extends across the left ventral side, and terminates dorsally. Accordingly, it belongs to the family Nassulidae, as defined above. Nassulides is rather similar to Nassula, differing solely by the oblique arrangement of the right nassulid organelles. Thus, its generic status might be questioned. On the other hand, nassulids are a species-rich group requiring some organization for practical purposes. The following species have to be combined with Nassulides: N. pictus (Greef, 1888) nov. comb. (basinoym: Nassula picta).....(2).

  1. Wilhelm Foissner, Helmut Berger, and Fritz Kohmann; [Taxonomische und okologische Revision der Ciliaten des Saprobiensystems-Band III: Hymenostomata, Prostomatida, Nassulida]. Informationsberichte des Bayerisches Landesamt fur Wasserwirtschaft. (1/94): pp 445-50 1994
  2. FOISSNER W., AGATHA S. & BERGER H. (2002): Soil ciliates (Protozoa, Ciliophora) from Namibia (Southwest Africa), with emphasis on two contrasting environments, the Etosha region and the Namib Desert. – Denisia, 5: 1–1459.

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What

Map (Araschnia levana)

Observer

renko

Date

April 28, 2017 04:01 PM CEST

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What

Blue-spot Hairstreak (Satyrium spini)

Observer

iwo2022

Date

June 26, 2014 04:15 PM CEST

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What

Black-veined White (Aporia crataegi)

Observer

felix_riegel

Date

June 15, 2023 02:09 PM CEST

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What

Galaxy Frog (Melanobatrachus indicus)

Observer

danielraju

Date

October 2020

Place

Kerala, IN (Google, OSM)

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What

Common Brimstone (Gonepteryx rhamni)

Observer

mobbini

Date

June 29, 2023 12:37 PM CEST

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What

Fly Pirates (Genus Bengalia)

Observer

wynand_uys

Date

February 9, 2017

Description

Fly Pirates rob Droptail Ants


Two days ago I was surprised to see flies of the genus Bengalia robbing false army ants of their larvae. Then I noticed that wherever there were ants of any species collecting food, there were Fly Pirates in attendance. The flies were robbing ants of whatever they picked up: Bits of flowers, seeds, or any organic material. Since there seemed to be an abundance of such snacks lying around on the forest floor, I started wondering why the flies couldn't simply gather their own food. Perhaps the flies saved labour by letting the ants discern edible stuff from the rest. So I ran a little experiment. What if I presented the flies with something that was obviously a good meal, like grated cheese?

So I placed some cheese within view/smell of the flies. No reaction!
In no time at all some droptail ants started breaking up the cheese gratings for easier transport back to their nest. The flies observed but kept their distance.

OBSERVATION: The flies ONLY become interested once the ants start carrying the cheese cuttings.
Before that, the flies observed the ants intently. At one stage a fly perched atop a passing duo of Toktokkies (busy trying to sort out their reproductive plumbing), enjoying a touring view of the feasting place. There were ample bits of cheese unattended, close to the flies, but their interest was focused only on the ants. Once an ant started moving a piece of cheese, a fly or two would start harassing it. Sometimes a tug of war ensued and sometimes the ant would let go and charge the fly, which then retreated. On some occasions the fly would take the fight into the air, gripping the cheese with its forelegs trying to shake the ants off. If that failed, it would drop the ant and cheese quite violently to the ground and then try and separate cheese from ant. On some occasions the fly would simply start feeding on a chunk of cheese while the ant was underway, not trying to separate it from the ant. The irritated ant would then drop the cheese and shoo the fly away (see gif animation).

What struck me was that the flies treated the droptails with less respect than the false army ants. The droptails have stingers, no? The false army ants have no stingers and are blind, but seem to have powerful mandibles and are quick movers.

Photos / Sounds

What

Common Blue (Polyommatus icarus)

Observer

carnifex

Date

August 6, 2016 02:00 AM CEST

Description

aberrant specimen

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What

Peacock Brenthia Moth (Brenthia pavonacella)

Observer

tshahan

Date

August 2021

Description

! many on poison ivy

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What

Mexican Honeypot Ant (Myrmecocystus mexicanus)

Observer

pseudomyrmex

Date

February 27, 2022 02:05 PM MST

Description

Two repletes from the same colony (dug up for research work)

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What

Kite-tailed Robberfly (Tolmerus atricapillus)

Observer

nocturnalmedia

Date

October 6, 2023 03:51 PM CEST

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What

Antarctic Midge (Belgica antarctica)

Observer

stu_crawford

Date

December 11, 2016 06:39 PM HST

Description

Rocky outcrop by a Gentoo penguin colony, on a warm sunny day.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

erikschabel

Date

September 19, 2023 11:32 PM CEST

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What

Carnea-group Green Lacewings (Complex Chrysoperla carnea)

Observer

arachon

Date

July 14, 2021 06:13 PM CEST

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What

Red-necked Wallaby (Notamacropus rufogriseus)

Observer

bertdevries

Date

June 9, 2023

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What

Damon Blue (Polyommatus damon)

Observer

gerdkuna

Date

July 2023

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What

Blue-spot Hairstreak (Satyrium spini)

Observer

mayerb

Date

July 1, 2023 03:13 PM CEST

Tags

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What

Poplar Admiral (Limenitis populi)

Observer

lepidopedia

Date

June 3, 2018 10:36 AM CEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Poplar Admiral (Limenitis populi)

Observer

martingrimm

Date

June 15, 2023 10:41 AM CEST

Description

@mobbini: dieser Weg ist für die Schillerfalter und Eisvögel am interessantesten. Als Köder gehen Hundekot (liegt da rum), stinkender Käse, überreife Bananen, (Frauen-)Urin. Am westlichen Ende des Wegs sollten nächste Woche auch Dukatenfalter fliegen. Unabhängig davon ist der gesamte Wald ein Paradies für Naturliebhaber...

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What

Pea Blue (Lampides boeticus)

Observer

r-ziebarth

Date

August 5, 2020 06:23 PM CEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Lime Hawkmoth (Mimas tiliae)

Observer

bixu

Date

April 27, 2023 08:58 AM CEST

Photos / Sounds

What

London Underground Mosquito (Culex pipiens ssp. molestus)

Observer

mozziebites

Date

September 3, 2020 11:50 AM AEST

Description

Adult female mosquito collected in carbon dioxide baited "encephalitis virus surveillance" trap.

Photos / Sounds

What

Odd Beetle (Thylodrias contractus)

Observer

pfau_tarleton

Date

July 20, 2020 07:44 PM CDT

Description

Assuming that this odd creature is a beetle, the elytra are very thin and do not fit together down the midline. And when alive, its motions were like that of a fly or wasp walking around.

The tiny beetle club is my collection of beetles 3 mm or smaller: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?verifiable=any&place_id=any&field:Similar%20observation%20set=Tiny%20beetle%20club%20(%3C%3D%203%20mm%20long)

Photos / Sounds

Observer

torym

Date

October 15, 2020 02:30 PM PDT

Description

Chinook hen, 16lbs, 33” long, 19” fat, 1lb 8 ounces of eggs caught trolling the siletz river. We have never seen this before on any salmon we have caught.

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What

Northern Caribbean Turtle Ant (Cephalotes varians)

Observer

stevenw12339

Date

June 2019

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What

Milky Masked Bee (Hylaeus lactifer)

Observer

dianneclarke

Date

February 16, 2021 10:50 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dgborin

Date

January 1, 2023 11:00 PM CET

Description

My first attempt at diatoms cleaning.

Three specimens observed, from the same sample of my previous observation https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/141202070 taken on 2022-11-05.

Stria density: 7-8 per 10 μm (center), 10-11 (extremities).
Puncta density: 11 per 10 μm.
Length 213-225 µm, width 41-44 µm.

Stigmata visible near the central nodule.

According to Diatoms of Europe vol.3 by Kurt Krammer, 2002, it looks like Cymbella peraspera:
“Valves moderately to distinctly dorsiventral, dorsal margin rather evenly arched, ventral margin with a slightly gibbous central portion. Valve ends not protracted and broadly rounded. Length (130)154-320 µm, breadth 44-52 µm, maximal length/breadth ratio about 6. Axial area moderately wide, linear, widening at mid-valve to form a shallow central area, about ¼ to nearly ⅓ of the valve breadth. Raphe slightly lateral, tape ring near proximal and distal ends, becoming filiform near the proximal and the distal ends. Proximal raphe ends with moderately large roundish central pores which are slightly ventrally deflected; terminal fissures sickle-shaped and dorsally bent. Striae throughout radiate. Puncta distinctly and more or less roundish in focus high and low. A large number of stigmata on the ventral side of the central nodule, in focus low differently shaped from the puncta, commonly distant from the middle ventral striae. Striae 5-8/10 µm, becoming up to 10/10 µm near the extremities. Puncta 7-10(11) in 10 µm.”

Photos / Sounds

What

Saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis)

Observer

surfbirder

Date

June 2004

Place

Vietnam (Google, OSM)

Description

The Saola was only discovered to science in 1992. There are no Saola in captivity. No Saola have been seen by scientists in the wild. A few records on camera trap exist. In 2004, there were still reports of Saola deep in the Truong Son mountains. This individual was confiscated from hunters in A'Luoi district, in the western reaches of the province. The other pictures are from interviews with Ka Tu ethnic hunters in A'Luoi and A'Vuong districts (Minh Hoang). The last photo is James with rangers from Hue Forest Department examining Saola tracks in A'Luoi - and identifzing schistamoglottis plants, reportedly favoured food for the saola.

In 2013, its status is critical. See what is happening on http://www.savethesaola.org/

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What

Megamouth Shark (Megachasma pelagios)

Observer

gmoo

Date

August 18, 1988

Place

Mandurah (Google, OSM)

Photos / Sounds

Observer

kueda

Date

June 24, 2017 02:15 PM PDT

Description

a) The jumping spider resemblance is insane. b) The range of sizes among adults is insane. What is up with this fly.

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What

Gulf Fritillary (Dione vanillae)

Observer

mnomg

Date

December 23, 2018

Description

color blanco

Tags

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What

Picasso Moth (Baorisa hieroglyphica)

Observer

purnendu

Date

April 22, 2012 08:01 PM BST

Description

Bomphu, 1940m, Eaglenest, Arunachal Pradesh, India, 22 April 2012

Baorisa hieroglyphica

Photos / Sounds

Observer

sohkamyung

Date

January 31, 2017 11:35 AM +08

Photos / Sounds

Observer

coddiwompler

Description

Enchoptera cf. nigricornis, or new species.

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What

Owlflies (Subfamily Ascalaphinae)

Observer

portioid

Date

September 3, 2017 01:18 PM HKT

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What

Southern Pink Underwing Moth (Phyllodes imperialis ssp. smithersi)

Observer

frankmcgrath

Date

March 2, 2022

Photos / Sounds

Observer

michaelrouse

Date

August 22, 2022 10:08 AM +1030

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What

Jersey Tiger (Euplagia quadripunctaria)

Observer

zacpeterson

Date

August 18, 2022 04:13 AM EEST

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What

Golden Toad (Incilius periglenes)

Observer

zacpeterson

Date

April 1987

Place

Costa Rica (Google, OSM)

Description

Date is approximate. 3 individuals (2 males & 1 female) seen sometime in April, 1987. My mother and father (@dmpeterson ) were living in Monteverde in the spring of 1987, staying with the Gavin family. I have been digitizing their old slides, and thought these ones were significant, so I uploaded them. The date and location are approximate, based on their best recollection.

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What

Apatani Glory (Elcysma ziroensis)

Observer

rohitmg

Date

September 6, 2019

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What

Japanese Silk Moth (Antheraea yamamai)

Observer

mw9825

Date

August 2022

Place

Bayern, DE (Google, OSM)

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What

Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)

Observer

frankielee91

Date

July 2022

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What

Monarch (Danaus plexippus)

Observer

suzannetilton

Date

September 24, 2016 07:32 PM +13

Description

White Monarch (nivosus)

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What

Short-tailed Blue (Cupido argiades)

Observer

norio_nomura

Date

June 17, 2020 07:10 AM JST

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What

Common Striped Hawkmoth (Hippotion eson)

Observer

magrietb

Date

July 21, 2018 02:51 PM SAST

Description

Grape hawk #6 reared

25 June 2017:

I am trying to learn how to tell the small annual invasion of similar but (I suspect) different hawk moth caterpillars on my grapevine apart. Today I collected #6 of my experiment.

22 July 2017:

The caterpillar spun a loose cocoon among bits of frass and food plant at the bottom of its tub.

5 September 2017:

Adult moth emerged.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

gaudettelaura

Date

April 8, 2018

Photos / Sounds

Observer

felix_riegel

Date

August 7, 2020 02:31 PM CEST

Description

Die Überraschung des Tages dieser 27mm große Necydalis major flog auf meine Hose und liess sich ausgibig (39) fotografieren.

The surprise of the day, this 27mm tall Necydalis major flew on my pants.
20 of 39 pictures

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What

Ringlet (Aphantopus hyperantus)

Observer

hoppy1951

Date

July 22, 2016 01:08 PM BST

Description

ab. arete (Muller 1764)

I wouldn't normally photograph a butterfly as worn as this, but it attracted my attention because of its very unusual wing markings, which are reduced to small white points with no encircling gold rings. This aberration was first described by the Danish entymologist Otto Friedrich Müller in 1764.

My garden, Gilwern, Wales, UK.

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What

Chisos Mountains Oak (Quercus tardifolia)

Observer

lexgarcia1

Photos / Sounds

Observer

easleybirding

Date

June 15, 2017

Description

I'm thinking this could be a moth that happens to look like a wasp - but not sure???

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What

American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)

Observer

fynkynd

Date

June 28, 2016 02:59 PM EDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Pink Snout Moth (Pachypodistes angulata)

Observer

heimatlos

Date

April 21, 2020 10:43 PM -05

Photos / Sounds

What

Silver-studded Blue (Plebejus argus)

Date

June 20, 2003

Description

An example of Myrmecophily
The butterfly Plebejus argus larva developed in the Lasius niger anthill, secreting substances that ants really like. This is a very young butterfly, her wings are not yet fully spread, and so far she cannot fly away. But probably, she also secretes a substance pleasant to the ants, and the ants, taking this opportunity, lick it.

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What

Crystal Skipper (Atrytonopsis quinteri)

Observer

rogerritt

Date

May 5, 2007 12:16 PM EDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Sturnula Metalmark (Calydna sturnula)

Observer

eduardo_axel

Date

August 1, 2017 03:34 PM -05

Description

Mariposa amate ♀
Calydna sturnula (Geyer, 1837)
Familia: Riodinidae

Photos / Sounds

What

Bee Lice (Genus Braula)

Observer

albertus

Date

May 25, 2019 10:19 AM SAST

Description

Sorry for the heavily cropped photo. I saw this Mite in May, recently I see more bees with se same mite. Looks like they disappeared but they are back

Photos / Sounds

What

Walker's Moth (Sosxetra grata)

Observer

easleybirding

Date

September 4, 2018 08:04 PM CDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Feathered Fiestamark (Symmachia accusatrix)

Observer

camerar

Date

October 10, 2017 11:30 AM UTC

Photos / Sounds

What

Sulawesi Moon Moth (Actias isis)

Observer

rockyreviko_

Date

January 2018

Photos / Sounds

What

Satin White Palpita (Palpita flegia)

Observer

bgomez

Date

February 10, 2004 01:06 PM HST

Description

increíble espectáculo de la llegada masiva de la "mariposa blanca" a El Ejido El Águila, Cacahoatán, en la zona de influencia de la Reserva de la Biosfera Volcán Tacana

Photos / Sounds

Observer

pougeon

Date

November 29, 2016

Photos / Sounds

Observer

marcello

Date

August 19, 2016 11:46 AM CEST

Description

Argynnis paphia ginandromorfo bilaterale con metà sinistra maschile e metà destra femminile della forma valesina

Photos / Sounds

Observer

rohitmg

Date

June 11, 2013

Description

Siamusotima sp

Photos / Sounds

Observer

nakarb

Date

June 7, 2017 01:13 PM MSK

Photos / Sounds

Observer

gernotkunz

Date

August 13, 2010 10:38 PM CEST