Photos / Sounds

What

Superb Fairywren (Malurus cyaneus)

Observer

lizardview

Date

October 1, 2022 09:56 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

gumnut

Date

September 29, 2022 09:27 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

gumnut

Date

September 28, 2022 06:37 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

lllhr50

Date

September 28, 2022 08:03 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

nicklambert

Date

September 27, 2022 07:51 PM +1030

Photos / Sounds

What

Curved-horn Moths (Superfamily Gelechioidea)

Observer

dustaway

Date

July 20, 2022 12:27 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

gumnut

Date

September 23, 2022 09:28 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

ethan_yeoman

Date

September 18, 2022 02:49 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

ethan_yeoman

Date

September 21, 2022 12:13 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Broad Leaved Native Cherry (Exocarpos latifolius)

Observer

reecetaverner

Date

September 20, 2022 10:34 AM AEST

Description

15-16m high tree. 15-16cm DBH

Photos / Sounds

Observer

reiner

Date

September 16, 2022 08:22 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

nicklambert

Date

November 13, 2021 08:41 PM AEDT

Photos / Sounds

Observer

reiner

Date

September 13, 2022 12:46 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

larney

Date

September 17, 2022 09:43 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

rqy-yong

Date

April 19, 2021 05:55 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Lady, Fungus, Scavenger, and Bark Beetles (Superfamily Coccinelloidea)

Observer

dustaway

Date

June 26, 2022 07:12 PM AEST

Description

Esme Lahey Reserve

Photos / Sounds

What

True Weevils (Family Curculionidae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

June 27, 2022 12:55 AM AEST

Description

3-4mm on Sandpaper Fig

Photos / Sounds

Observer

larney

Date

September 12, 2022 08:45 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Pygmy Grasshoppers (Family Tetrigidae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

January 10, 2022 06:49 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dustaway

Date

January 14, 2022 03:49 PM AEST

Description

Callidemum poropterum : Booyong FR

on Baloghia inophylla

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dustaway

Date

April 25, 2022 04:56 PM AEST

Description

mystery species 'Poropterus maculatus' of Lea 1928?

Photos / Sounds

Observer

nicklambert

Date

August 4, 2022 08:19 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Curved-horn Moths (Superfamily Gelechioidea)

Observer

dustaway

Date

August 10, 2021 06:04 PM AEST

Description

mystery moth RPRR

Photos / Sounds

What

Red-and-black Spiders (Family Nicodamidae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

September 30, 2021 04:59 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

nicklambert

Date

July 15, 2022 10:53 AM AWST

Description

On Acacia

Photos / Sounds

Observer

reiner

Date

October 1, 2018 06:42 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

domf

Date

March 4, 2020 11:55 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

johneichler

Date

June 20, 2021 02:44 PM AEST

Description

Unknown spider found under bark on a tree.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

domf

Date

January 22, 2021 09:58 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

maureen_gubbels

Date

February 2021

Photos / Sounds

What

Orbweavers (Family Araneidae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

March 24, 2020 04:56 PM AEST

Description

Araneidae : RPRR

Photos / Sounds

What

Typical Orbweavers (Subfamily Araneinae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

April 6, 2020 04:21 PM AEST

Description

Araneinae : RPRR

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dustaway

Date

September 30, 2020 05:24 PM AEST

Description

15mm cryptic 'Eriophora'/Acroaspis interface...larger than described specimens of latter
Wilson Nature Reserve

Photos / Sounds

What

Orbweavers (Family Araneidae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

September 23, 2021 05:42 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

clairecottage

Date

February 22, 2021 09:40 PM AEDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Cutworm Moths and Allies (Family Noctuidae)

Observer

sarahcobbaus

Date

August 6, 2020 08:36 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Date

May 8, 2022 11:23 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Autumn Gum Moth (Mnesampela privata)

Observer

daviaker

Date

October 17, 2021 09:37 PM AEDT

Description

I did not realise until about a month later that tiny parasites had emerged from these moth eggs. to see the full sequence click on the tag pc441.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

clairecottage

Date

October 24, 2021 08:40 PM AEDT

Description

We have this as an "unnamed species".

Photos / Sounds

What

Curved-horn Moths (Superfamily Gelechioidea)

Observer

dustaway

Date

January 12, 2020 09:40 PM AEST

Description

seen once before in NSW, in 2016
Gelechioidea 10mm
TM QLD AU

Photos / Sounds

What

Spiny Rainforest Katydid (Phricta spinosa)

Observer

zosterops99

Date

July 14, 2022 01:50 PM AEST

Description

Last one of the prickly katydids..

Photos / Sounds

Observer

nicklambert

Date

March 13, 2021 06:50 PM AEDT

Photos / Sounds

What

Orbweavers (Family Araneidae)

Observer

reiner

Date

August 8, 2022 12:02 AM AEST

Description

Socca?

Photos / Sounds

Observer

clairecottage

Date

December 19, 2021 04:13 AM AEDT

Photos / Sounds

Observer

larney

Date

April 13, 2022 08:20 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Light Brown Apple Moth (Epiphyas postvittana)

Observer

kdbishop69

Date

June 19, 2022 08:31 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Tortricine Leafroller Moths (Subfamily Tortricinae)

Observer

kdbishop69

Date

June 19, 2022 08:32 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Tortricine Leafroller Moths (Subfamily Tortricinae)

Observer

peregrine80

Date

July 29, 2022 08:10 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Powerful Owl (Ninox strenua)

Observer

marietarrant

Date

August 2022

Photos / Sounds

What

Butterflies and Moths (Order Lepidoptera)

Observer

dianneclarke

Date

May 6, 2020 07:00 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Red-and-black Spiders (Family Nicodamidae)

Observer

deeqld

Date

July 11, 2022

Photos / Sounds

What

Narrow-lined Bark Moth (Boarmia phricomita)

Observer

nicklambert

Date

September 28, 2021 07:00 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Australian Cheesewood (Pittosporum undulatum)

Observer

thebeachcomber

Date

July 15, 2020 03:02 PM AEST

Description

Damage possibly from Lamprolina?

Photos / Sounds

What

Tortricid Leafroller Moths (Family Tortricidae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

March 28, 2021 09:33 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Tortricine Leafroller Moths (Subfamily Tortricinae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

May 9, 2021 02:29 AM AEST

Description

Tortricinae

Photos / Sounds

What

Tortricid Leafroller Moths (Family Tortricidae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

December 12, 2021 06:29 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Tortricid Leafroller Moths (Family Tortricidae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

December 14, 2021 06:31 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Tortricine Leafroller Moths (Subfamily Tortricinae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

January 30, 2022 09:57 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Tortricine Leafroller Moths (Subfamily Tortricinae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

February 21, 2022 04:58 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Tortoise and Hispine Beetles (Subfamily Cassidinae)

Observer

zosterops99

Date

July 12, 2022 09:51 AM AEST

Description

I think this is from Cassidinae but I can't find a match. There were eggs (I think) around it, but I'm not sure if there is any connection.

It looks like the coconut hispine beetle without the flanges.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

zosterops99

Date

July 12, 2022 09:49 AM AEST

Description

Surely a Crabronid?

Photos / Sounds

What

Ghost Jumping Spiders (Genus Tauala)

Observer

zosterops99

Date

July 11, 2022 05:13 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Grasshoppers, Crickets, and Katydids (Order Orthoptera)

Observer

dustaway

Date

May 26, 2021 04:24 PM AEST

Description

Orthoptera

Photos / Sounds

What

Haffner's Snub-Nose (Mastighaphoides haffneri)

Observer

maureen_gubbels

Date

November 2021

Photos / Sounds

Observer

coddiwompler

Date

July 2022

Description

Approx 10mm.
Web on a paperbark tree.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

matthew_connors

Date

June 30, 2018 06:30 PM AEST

Description

What an interesting weevil! This is one of those things that I'm sure I've seen before, and yet there are apparently no other sightings of anything remotely similar up this way. Maybe I do just get really lucky with finding weird things. Anyway, this is clearly Amycterini but can I do any better? Well, there are a lot of genera (ALA lists 40!!) but it seems like Ferguson reviewed most of them, so hopefully it won't be too bad. Before we even get into those though, we can immediately discard Xenommamycterus so that is helpful.

Let's get into Ferguson then. I can't find Part I for some reason so we'll start with Part II, which is itself split into two parts. They deal with the very speciose genus Talaurinus. Aaaaand after a quick dip in, let's deal with that later. We'll skip ahead to Part III :P Notonophes and Pseudonotonophes both have the rostrum relatively flat, so they are out. Myotrotus has the elytra finely granulated. Gagatophorus (=Macramycterus) is similar but only found in WA and is rather more strongly tuberculate than this by the look of images. Chriotyphus has no large granules and is also only from WA.

Next we'll look at Part IV, dealing with the genus Sclerorinus. The species are all southerly in distribution and have a relatively flat rostrum, so they are all out. That's quite a relief because there are a great number of them!

Part V is about Molochtus and Cubicorhynchus. Molochtus has striate, punctured elytra so it is out. Cubicorhynchus is the same really, so it is out too.

Part VI deals with Acantholophus, another very speciose genus. We cannot really rule it out from the generic description alone, but Ferguson does say that no species are known from the far north. Indeed, the only ALA records for the genus anywhere near here is a record of A. kreffti in Townsville. The description of that species clearly rules it out, and I think I am going to ignore Acantholophus for the time being, because I don't really want to deal with it!

Up next - Part VII, Hyborrhynchus (=Hyborrhinus) and allied genera. As well as Hyborrhinus, it deals with Neohyborrhynchus, Parahyborrhynchus, and Anascoptes. From the key we can rule out Hyborrhinus and Anascoptes, but all of these genera are very southern in distribution so I think in fact we can rule all of them out. ALA records seemingly confirm this, so I am chucking them all!

Part VIII deals with the 'Euomides', an artificial grouping of genera that generally have short scapes but not always. There are a very large number of genera detailed in this one, and luckily for us their distributions are laid out in a nice table early on. Euomus, Euomella, Brachymycterus, Cucullothorax, Alexirhea, Aedriodes, Melanegis, Oditesus, Ennothus, Polycreta, and Paroditesus are restricted to WA, so they are all out! According to ALA, Polycreta is a synonym of Ennothus and Paroditesus of Oditesus, but these do not matter much as all four are out. Brachymycterus also provides some problems though, as apparently it is extinct. The only extant species has now been moved to Brachyrothus, so that one is out. Of the remaining genera, Atychoria is only known from SA, and Sosytelus only from NSW. The latter goes into Queensland according to ALA records, so I might double check the description. Dialeptopus is only known from WA and SA (+Vic according to ALA), Tetralophus from SA, Vic, and possibly WA (ALA says Tas too), and Acherres from WA, SA, and central Australia - they are all out. Three genera have been recorded in Queensland, namely Mythites, Bubaris, and Amorphorhinus. So we should check those four, plus Sosytelus. Although in fact, Bubaris is now a synonym of Sosytelus so I guess that all makes sense then! Sosytelus sensu Ferguson is restricted to NSW, so I guess we don't have to look there in the paper. Going by the description, Mythites has the rostrum constricted at the base, so it is out. 'Bubaris' has the antennal scapes short and apically dilated, so it is out too (as therefore is Sosytelus). Amorphorhinus is also seemingly out, as the rostrum is too short and broad, and none of the species really match either.

So what now? Well I have located Part I which deals with Psalidura (=Amycterus), another of those very speciose genera. From the key we can rule out everything except Amycterus talpa, A. elongatus, A. cuneicaudatus, A. caudatus, A. forficulatus, A. metasternalis, A. falciformis, A. kosciuskoanus, A. mirabilis, A. cultratus, A. monticola, A. abnormis, and A. perlatus. They have various other names in the paper which are now synonyms, and I can't be bothered writing out what is what so you can all just work it out! A. kosciuskoanus is out for reasons that should be obvious, but the others I will go through. There are too many to go into detail with, but they are all out. Most are finely granulated on the pronotum and none look like this. Into the bin!

So what's next then? Well we have Talaurinus left, plus some genera split from Talaurinus in the second section of Part II, plus some other genera described after Ferguson's revisions were completed. Hypotomops is described here and does not match, and Achorostoma is described here and also does not match. Antalaurinus and Talaurinellus were both described by Zimmerman (alas, I do not have the book!) for species that were treated by Ferguson under Talaurinus, so we will be fine just going ahead to look in the review(s).

Latalaurinus and its synonym Peritalaurinus are described here; both have a very short rostrum, wider than long, and are entirely dark (and restricted to WA). Ophthalamycterus, described next, is also entirely dark and restricted to WA. After that, Dicherotropis; one species is entirely dark and the other is without large elytral granules, and I believe both are restricted to WA again. Finally, Sclerorrhinella is restricted to WA yet again, and none of the species match.

So we are left with Talaurinus sensu Ferguson, and the many many species contained within. There are about 7 pages of key, starting here (weird format but okay). That is a lot. Wow. Okay. Time to dive in I guess. My main problem with these keys is not even that I can't see all of the features, it's that I don't know what some of the things even look like. Part of that is because I am not a weevil expert, but part of it is also because the key is stupid. How am I supposed to know if the weevil has larger granules or smaller granules? Larger or smaller than what?? So I will make a shortlist of possible species, then go through the individual descriptions to see what I can rule out.

Possibilities are: T. mitchelli, T. longipes, T. alternans, T. miliaris, T. catenulatus, T. subvittatus, T. sobrinus, T. scabrosus, T. irroratus, T. tuberculosus (as T. tuberculatus), T. semispinosus (and synonyms T. pastillarius and T. pustulosus), T. roei (as T. funereus), T. simulator, and T. incanescens (and synonym T. i. muricatus). But because I'm not 100% certain that I'm interpreting some of the characters correctly, I'd also like to double-check Amycterus variegatus (as T. variegatus), T. angularis, T. papulosus, T. pallidus, T. gayndahensis, T. sphaerulatus, T. alternatus, T. rugicollis, T. scaber, T. regularis (and synonym T. solidus), A. rufipes (as T. rufipes), A. morbillosus (as T. morbillosus, and synonym T. m-elevatus), and A. orthodoxus (as T. orthodoxus, and synonym T. melancholicus). That is quite a few, alas.

Welp, time to get into it I guess. I'll just go through and rule out anything easy, then come back to the more similar ones. A. variegatus has the pronotum evenly granulate. T. angularis does not have three tubercle-free stripes on the pronotum, and neither does T. papulosus, nor T. pallidus. T. gayndahensis has only small tubercles on the elytra. T. sphaerulatus has no tubercle-free pronotal areas.

That finishes up the first part, so onto the continuation. T. alternans does not have tubercle-free pronotal areas, and neither does T. longipes, nor T. miliaris, T. mitchellii, T. alternatus, and T. rugicollis. T. catenulatus is a decent match so I will save that for later. T. pustulatus does not have tubercle-free pronotal areas, nor does T. funereus. Some things about T. subvittatus match very well and other things seem wrong, so I will come back to it. T. sobrinus is a good match too so we will compare that in more detail later. T. scabrosus has more large tubercles on the elytra. T. tuberculatus has no tubercle-free area on the pronotum. T. irroratus is also a decent match so I will come back to it. The same also for T. incanescens.

Now I reach the end of the review, but we still have names to check off! So what happened? I think the review does not actually cover all species, and we will have to go digging elsewhere, alas. A. morbillosus is listed in the first section under its supposed synonym T. penicillatus; it has no tubercle-free areas on the pronotum. This paper indicates that T. melancholicus (=Amycterus orthodoxus) is only found in southeastern Australia, so I am happy to rule it out. It also tells us that "T. scaber Boisd., [is] an aberrant tuberculate form [that] occurs inland in Victoria", and ALA confirms this with also a few records from southern NSW. I am happy ruling it out. And here is the information I sought on T. semispinosus and T. simulator. Both are from WA and they seem to both have granules on the entire pronotum. And finally, T. regularis and A. rufipes are both discussed here; neither are from anywhere near here and the description of the former does not match.

I should also note that these three articles (and these two) also have several descriptions of new(er) Talaurinus species, none of which match mine.

So, we have our short short list then - T. catenulatus, T. subvittatus, T. sobrinus, T. irroratus, and T. incanescens. Firstly, what are their recorded distributions? T. catenulatus is from 'Queensland' with no closer locality. T. subvittatus is from the Atherton district in north Queensland (close to here). T. sobrinus from 'Queensland' and Cardwell (also close to here). T. irroratus is from NSW. T. incanescens is from WA, specifically the southwest (King George's Sound). So I think it's much more likely to be one of the first three than the latter two. Let's look more closely.

Although the pronotum of T. incanescens is a pretty good match, the elytra are less so, with more rows of granules than mine seems to have. It also says that the median line and 'collar' are marked on the pronotum, and although I can see the collar I cannot see any trace of an actual median sulcus. So I think T. incanescens is out.

The description indicates that T. irroratus does not have a collar impression on the pronotum, so it is also out.

Just left with three Queensland species now, and it becomes trickier. Luckily though, two of them are pictured here. Here's T. subvittatus:

And here's T. sobrinus:

Right away we can see that T. sobrinus is not really all that close, whereas T. subvittatus on the other hand is very similar to this one. So I think I will rule out T. sobrinus.

So what are the key differences between T. catenulatus and T. subvittatus? It has this to say about the colour; for T. catenulatus: "Black, opaque, granules subnitid, rather densely clothed with greyish scales; head and rostrum bivittate" and for T. subvittatus: "Black, ♂ abraded, ♀ variegated with white scales; head with median (bifurcate on rostrum) and supraorbital vittae, prothorax trivittate on disc and with white on sides, elytra maculate, the macules formind irregular vittae". From that, this seems very much closer to T. subvittatus.

What about the elytral structure? For T. catenulatus male:

"Eyltra ... moderately ovate, not greatly ampliate; humeral angle with a small nodule; disc puncto-striate, rugulose between punctures; interstices granulate, first at base only costate; second with four or five, large, elongate granules; third with eight large, elongate and two smaller ones on declivity; fourth without granules, fifth with twelve stouter, less elongate, and closer together; sixth with eight smaller ones not reaching base; sides striate-punctate, interstices irregularly granulate."

And female:

"Elytra with tubercles on interstices elongate, flattened, second with five, third with ten, fourth with none, fifth with ten, sixth with seven, seventh with about ten, almost completely on side, the tubercles very little prominent, sides with interstices similar."

For T. subvittatus male:

"Elytra ... subovate, apex moderately abruptly rounded, base arcuate; humeral angles tuberculiform, projecting laterally; sculpture rough and confused, with small rounded granules hardly in striae, interstices not raised but with rather strong nitid tubercles, sutural with three or four small granules at base, second with three distant tubercles in middle, and three more conical on declivity, extending to apex; third with five smaller rounded ones extending from base to middle, and two more posteriorly; fourth with two near middle, fifth with three spaced out ones near shoulder, and four or five more conical and more closely placed posteriorly; sixth with four conical distantly placed tubercles, seventh with six smaller ones; sides transversely rugose, not granulate."

And for female:

"Elytral tubercles rather larger, and about six in all on third interstice, larger and more conical"

It doesn't quite match any of them exactly, but from that it seems far closer to T. subvittatus than to T. catenulatus. The colour is spot on, and the description of the elytral tubercles is very close, especially for the first three interstices. Notably there are no tubercles on mine on the fourth interstice but I don't think that's an unreasonable amount of variation. So all in all I am quite happy to call this Talaurinus subvittatus. Finally. It has been many days of weevils, and I am glad to be done!

Photos / Sounds

Observer

damienbr

Date

February 7, 2020 03:51 PM HST

Photos / Sounds

What

White-marked Ground Spiders (Family Lamponidae)

Observer

ethan_yeoman

Date

June 14, 2022 09:14 PM AEST

Description

appears to be a new genus, probably Lamponinae but endite demarcation is subtle and not easily visible.

Photos / Sounds

What

True Weevils (Family Curculionidae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

September 7, 2021 04:38 PM AEST

Description

bright orange-brown, fine scales
4-5mm on Elaeocarpaceae>Sloanea

Photos / Sounds

What

Cocoon Weevils (Subfamily Hyperinae)

Observer

dustaway

Date

August 15, 2021 04:36 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

What

Curved-horn Moths (Superfamily Gelechioidea)

Observer

wellsii

Date

September 2, 2019 08:59 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

mhocking

Date

June 9, 2022 03:42 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

tjeales

Date

October 29, 2021 12:14 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

larney

Date

January 28, 2021 10:01 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

larney

Date

December 9, 2020 02:24 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

martinlagerwey

Date

February 18, 2020 06:33 AM AEDT

Photos / Sounds

Observer

grisper1

Date

December 27, 2017 12:16 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

matthew_connors

Date

June 28, 2018 10:22 AM AEST

Description

Alright, can we get anywhere with this? It's seemingly a common species in the area, but it has not yet received an ID. The dampness of the specimen obscures some things so there's a better picture here that we can reference too.
There are... a lot of Leptopius species. So let's just look at a smaller sample to start with. ALA records 10 different species of Leptopius in the Wet Tropics region - L. nodicollis, L. brachystylus, L. clavus, L. fasciculatus, L. tribulus, L. maleficus, L. horridus, L. humeralis, L. tuberculatus, and L. ferus. According to Lea (1916), L. ferus is a synonym of L. tribulus so that gives us one less to deal with. I think I have read that there is some significant sexual dimorphism in some of the species, so just because we have photos of some doesn't necessarily rule them out. That said though, there are photos of L. clavus, L. brachystylus, L. tribulus, and L. tuberculatus. I have seen many L. clavus in Townsville but nothing like this one there, so I am happy to definitively rule that one out. The others though I will still investigate.

Some of the descriptions are here so let's start. First up is L. nodicollis, which is actually a very good match. It has four large tubercles arranged in a transverse row on the elytra, and it has a shiny tubercle on the thorax. ALA also indicates many records from this area, so I think that's probably our most likely option. Let's see if we can rule the others out though. (Also supporting, Lea says here "On several specimens there is a broad band of obscure white at sides of elytra")

Following that is the description of L. maleficus, which is supposedly quite similar to L. nodicollis but with four longitudinal rows of smaller tubercles on the elytra. Mine sort of does look like it has some small tubercles, but they are really not very large and if we look at this one we see that really they are just part of the punctured elytral striae. So I don't think that's what I have here. Oddly though there don't really seem to be any local iNat sightings of anything fitting that description.

After that is L. brachystylus, which agrees with the specimen that I've linked above. After that is L. horridus which is also tuberculate, and does not have the shiny patch on the thorax (neither does L. brachystylus for that matter). I reckon this is a good chance at being L. horridus because it does not seem to match the other L. tribulus images here on iNat.

Next up we'll look here, which also has a good key to species. It briefly mentions that L. ferus (=L. tribulus) has a small humeral spine and that there are conjoined tubercles on the elytral suture, so even though it does not describe the species in full, we can rule it out. There is also a short comment on L. humeralis, which apparently has a very distinct spine on the shoulder, so it too is out. And finally, the description of L. fasciculatus states that it has no large tubercles, and is covered in bundles of setae. So that too is out.

So it seems that I probably do have L. nodicollis here. Does the key also get us there? Well, with the caveat that I can't really tell if the breast is armed, or if intermediate carinae are trifurcate, yes it does get us to L. nodicollis. But the other possibilities are from the other side of the country, and many have even been moved to other genera. And with the comment about the pale stripe, I think this is a pretty perfect match for L. nodicollis.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

jacqui-i

Date

October 1, 2021 12:38 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

akoslumnitzer

Date

October 3, 2021 08:00 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

tjeales

Date

April 10, 2021 01:47 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

wyliecath

Date

February 1, 2020 08:53 AM AEST

Description

Lamington National Park, Queensland Australia.
Photo Ann Ingham.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

muddles

Date

January 12, 2016

Description

unknown weevil

Photos / Sounds

Observer

tjeales

Date

December 29, 2019 08:35 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

davidtng

Date

March 5, 2020 05:09 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Date

March 22, 2020 10:23 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

gregtasney

Date

April 5, 2020 07:36 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Date

March 10, 2016 01:39 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

sarahcobbaus

Date

July 9, 2020 08:23 PM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

larney

Date

November 28, 2020 07:03 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

nadialee

Date

March 10, 2021 09:45 AM AEST

Photos / Sounds

Observer

johnlenagan

Date

January 15, 2019 07:01 PM AEDT

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dustaway

Date

July 13, 2018 05:04 PM AEST

Description

Leptopius sp. : RPRR Lismore NSW AU : 12mm

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dustaway

Date

May 24, 2019 05:59 PM AEST

Description

Leptopius : RPRR : 18mm

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dustaway

Date

May 2, 2020 04:44 PM AEST

Description

Leptopius sp. : RPRR

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dustaway

Date

July 9, 2020 03:10 PM AEST

Description

Leptopius sp. : RPRR

Photos / Sounds

Observer

dustaway

Date

November 18, 2021 01:03 PM AEST

Description

Chrysomelinae 8mm Chalcomela